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Specializing in Rare and Antiquarian Books on the Occult and more.

THE RITES OF ELEUSIS Aleister Crowley Numbered Edition (London, 1990)

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THE RITES OF ELEUSIS Aleister Crowley Numbered Edition (London, 1990)

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THE RITES OF ELEUSIS Aleister Crowley Numbered Edition (London, 1990)

350.00

Crowley, Aleister (Edited by Keith Richmond). The Rites of Eleusis.  London: Mandrake Press. 1990.

First Edition Thus. Limited to 1000 hand-numbered copies. This is copy #37. Hardcover. Tall 4to. With illustrations by Dwina Murphy-Gibb. Increasingly uncommon in this edition. FINE IN NEAR FINE DUST JACKET.

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Contains the complete scripts of all 7 of the Rites, with introduction by Richmond and explanatory essays by Richmond and Terence DuQuesne. Also includes a series of adorations, "The Treasure House of Images" by Capt J.F.C. Fuller, and Crowley's "Magick Book 4 (Liber O)". The Rites of Eleusis were a series of seven public invocations or rites written by Crowley, each centered on one of the seven classical planets of antiquity. They were dramatically performed by Crowley, along with Leila Waddell (Laylah), and Victor Neuburg in October and November, 1910, at Caxton Hall in London. This act brought Crowley's occult organization the A.’. A.’. into the public eye.  

The names of the seven Rites are The Rite of "Saturn", "Jupiter", "Mars", "Sol", "Venus", "Mercury" and "Luna". Crowley claimed that the Rites were designed to inspire the audience with ‘religious ecstasy’, and that merely reading them would help people "cultivate their highest faculties". Some in the popular press thought otherwise, and considered the Rites an immoral display, riddled with blasphemy and erotic suggestion.