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Specializing in Rare and Antiquarian Books on the Occult and more.

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THE NATURAL GENESIS or, Second Part Of The Book Of The Beginnings (1974) by Gerald Massey (2 Volumes in Slipcase)

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THE NATURAL GENESIS or, Second Part Of The Book Of The Beginnings (1974) by Gerald Massey (2 Volumes in Slipcase)

250.00

MASSEY, Gerald 

The Natural Genesis, Or, Second Part Of The Book Of The Beginnings. Containing An Attempt To Recover And Reconstitute The Lost Origines Of The Myths And Mysteries, Types And Symbols, Religion And Language, With Egypt For The Mouthpiece And Africa As The Birthplace (Two Volumes in Slipcase)

New York: Samuel Weiser, 1974. First American Edition (UK edition was published in 1883). Two volumes in slipcase. Hardcover. Small quarto. Brown cloth with gilt titles and designs to spines. Issued without dust jackets. Housed in publisher’s slipcase. xvi + 552, vi + 535pp. A few black and white line figures. 

Books have light handling wear but remain in very good or better condition. Issued without dust jackets. The slipcase is also in very good condition. 

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If there is a unifying theme in Massey’s work, it is that Africa was the primal source of the world’s people, languages, myths, symbols, and religions and that Egypt was indeed Africa’s mouthpiece. In Massey’s view, Egypt brought African genius to its highest and finest expression then proceeded to instruct the world in Africa’s wisdom.  This conviction might have been inspired by the assertions of the important classical writers and mythographers of antiquity such as Herodotus, Hecataeus, Diodorus, and Plutarch who reported the commonly-accepted story that the Egyptian Osiris (also called ‘Dionysus’ by the Greeks) traveled throughout the world bringing the blessings of civilization everywhere he went.  However, Massey found independent verification of this view from his exhaustive studies of the myths, symbols, beliefs, and customs of many lands all over the world.  In his eyes, metaphorically speaking, Inner Africa was the Mother, the Nile the Father, and Egypt the brilliant Son and Fulfiller. In The Natural Genesis, Massey shows how the early evolution of human consciousness derived from the development of types. He painstakingly explores the important primeval types that passed in various forms into every religion. The tree and serpent were two such types that formed a dyad that constantly reappeared in the mythic symbolism of different lands and which were incomparably older than the form in which they are encountered in Genesis.  The conjunction of these two types must have arisen from the association of the tree and arboreal python found throughout Africa. At the astronomical stage of “mytho-genesis”, the tree was figured as a type of the pole and the serpent a type of the string of seven circumpolar stars that encircle or ‘coil’ around the pole. The caduceus of Hermes and the Hindu Kundalini serpent coiled around the spinal column are two later applications of this typological dyad.  In addition to tree and python, Massey found that there were many other feminine and maternal types: the mount or rock, the cave, the dove, the well, the ark, and the cow are but a few examples. In his elaboration of the typological system, Massey’s chapter in the second volume, Typology of Time, is particularly important because the determination and recording of cycles and their periodicity became ever more significant to Kamite (Kemet, or the ‘black land’, a name for Ancient Egypt) mentality as settled communities were formed that depended on seasonal agriculture for sustenance.  The earliest modes of time-reckoning were to be found in nature, and the female because of her more or less regular monthly periodicity, became an early type of time-keeper. At a later stage, the heavenly bodies with their regular and cyclic movements became the chief tellers of time but nature was man’s first teacher before the heavens were mapped. Massey elaboartes on the Typology of Primitive Customs, of the Two Truths, of Numbers, the Primordial Onomatopoeia, the Mythical Great Mother, the Two Sisters, the Twins, Triads and Trinities, the typology of Mythical Creations, the Fall in Heaven and on Earth, the Deluge and the Ark, the typology of the Word or Logos, and of Equinoctial Christolatry. He ends the book with a comparative vocabulary of the Sanskrit and Egyptian languages.