Contact Us

Use the form on the right to contact us.

You can edit the text in this area, and change where the contact form on the right submits to, by entering edit mode using the modes on the bottom right. 

503-704-2376

Specializing in Rare and Antiquarian Books on the Occult and more.

Current Offerings

PRAYER, MAGIC, AND THE STARS IN THE ANCIENT AND LATE ANTIQUE WORLD (2003) edited by Scott Noegel, etc. (Paperback)

IMG_2793.jpeg
IMG_2795.jpeg
IMG_2796.jpeg
IMG_2793.jpeg
IMG_2795.jpeg
IMG_2796.jpeg

PRAYER, MAGIC, AND THE STARS IN THE ANCIENT AND LATE ANTIQUE WORLD (2003) edited by Scott Noegel, etc. (Paperback)

30.00

NOEGEL, Scott, with Joel Walker and Baron Wheeler (Edited by)

Prayer, Magic, and the Stars in the Ancient and Late Antique World

University Park: Penn State University Press. 2003. Paperback. 255 pp. 

A near fine copy

Add To Cart

In the religious systems of ancient Mesopotamia, Egypt, and the Mediterranean, gods and demigods were neither abstract nor distant, but communicated with mankind through signs and active intervention. Men and women were thus eager to interpret, appeal to, and even control the gods and their agents. In Prayer, Magic, and the Stars in the Ancient and Late Antique World, a distinguished array of scholars explores the many ways in which people in the ancient world sought to gain access to—or, in some cases, to bind or escape from—the divine powers of heaven and earth. Grounded in a variety of disciplines, including Assyriology, Classics, and early Islamic history, the fifteen essays in this volume cover a broad geographic area: Greece, Egypt, Syria-Palestine, Mesopotamia, and Persia. Topics include celestial divination in early Mesopotamia, the civic festivals of classical Athens, and Christian magical papyri from Coptic Egypt. Moving forward to Late Antiquity, we see how Judaism, Christianity, and Islam each incorporated many aspects of ancient Near Eastern and Graeco-Roman religion into their own prayers, rituals, and conceptions. Even if they no longer conceived of the sun, moon, and the stars as eternal or divine, Christians, Jews, and Muslims often continued to study the movements of the heavens as a map on which divine power could be read.