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Specializing in Rare and Antiquarian Books on the Occult and more.

Current Offerings

PLUTARCH'S LIVES. The Translation Called Dryden's, in 5 Volumes (1865) Corrected from the Greek by A. H. Clough (Limited to 100 Copies)

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PLUTARCH'S LIVES. The Translation Called Dryden's, in 5 Volumes (1865) Corrected from the Greek by A. H. Clough (Limited to 100 Copies)

350.00

PLUTARCH (Corrected from the Greek and Revised by A. H. Clough). Plutarch's Lives. The Translation Called Dryden's (5 Volumes)

Boston: Little, Brown, and Company, 1865. Reprint. 5 Volume Set. Limited to 100 copies. Hardcover. Quarto. 1/2 brown morocco over marbled boards. Gilt and tooled spine with 5 raised bands. Top edge gilt. Marbled endpapers. xxxi + 414, iii + 422, iii + 452, iii + 570, iii + 618 pp. Index of Historical and Geographical Proper Names and Index for Reference as to the Pronunciation of Proper Names at end of volume 5. 

Light rubbing, edge and corner wear, spines have uniformly faded to a light brown. Several pages in volumes 3, 4, and 5 are unopened along fore-edge. Former owner's name to fly leaf on each volume. This remains a very good (and attractive) set. 

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Plutarch's classic work: Lives of the Noble Greeks and Romans, commonly called Parallel Lives or Plutarch's Lives, is a series of biographies of famous men, arranged in tandem to illuminate their common moral virtues or failings, probably written at the beginning of the second century AD. It is a work of considerable importance, not only as a source of information about the individuals described, but also about the times in which they lived. See photographs for a full list of contents. 

As is explained in the opening paragraph of his Life of Alexander, Plutarch was not concerned with history so much as the influence of character, good or bad, on the lives and destinies of men. Whereas sometimes he barely touched on epoch-making events, he devoted much space to charming anecdote and incidental triviality, reasoning that this often said far more for his subjects than even their most famous accomplishments. He sought to provide rounded portraits, likening his craft to that of a painter; indeed, he went to tremendous lengths (often leading to tenuous comparisons) to draw parallels between physical appearance and moral character.  In many ways, he must be counted amongst the earliest moral philosophers.